April 4, 2017

Today, April 4: Is there an existential threat to human rights?


Shifting Grounds_2

April 4, 2017


“Is there an existential threat to human rights?”


12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
WCC 4059


Please join the Human Rights Program for a discussion with Professors Tyler Giannini and Susan Farbstein, Co-Directors of the International Human Rights Clinic, who will examine global trends, the changing nature of U.S. exceptionalism, and human rights methods in the post-truth atmosphere. More broadly, they will consider whether there are existential threats facing human rights and the human rights movement. This is the final event in the Human Rights Program’s three-part Shifting Ground series, which reflects on the human rights landscape after the election of President Trump.

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April 3, 2017

Today, April 3: Banning nuclear weapons: A milestone for disarmament


Nuclear Poster_Final-1April 3, 2017


“Banning nuclear weapons: A milestone for disarmament”


12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
WCC 1019

Lunch provided


Please join us for a conversation with two disarmament leaders, who will be coming straight from the UN’s groundbreaking negotiations of a treaty to ban nuclear weapons.

Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), and Richard Moyes, managing director of Article 36, have played significant roles in reframing the nuclear weapons debate as a humanitarian issue rather than a national security one. That shift helped drive the UN General Assembly to break a decades-long stalemate and commit to banning nuclear weapons. Fihn and Moyes will offer a civil society perspective on the process that led to treaty negotiations and reflect on the opening session in March. They will also talk about the work still to be done and their hopes for the final outcome.

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March 30, 2017

Op-Ed: UN investigation can help Myanmar down the path of democracy


This opinion piece by Clinical Advocacy Fellow Yee Htun and Tyler Giannini, co-director of the International Human Rights Clinic, appeared in The Irrawaddy on March 29, 2017


UN Investigation Can Help Myanmar Down the Path of Democracy



At first glance, the UN Human Rights Council resolution passed on Myanmar looks like a rebuke of Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy (NLD) government. The resolution calls for an international investigation into “alleged recent human rights violations by the military and security forces,” singling out Rakhine State in particular for scrutiny.

Given her muted public response to the violence, her government’s denials, and the lack of any serious domestic investigation to date, it would be easy to lay a lot of the blame at Aung San Suu Kyi’s door. But the real story remains in plain sight: there are roadblocks that prevent her and the civilian government from investigating and controlling the abuses of security forces. These roadblocks are rooted in the country’s Constitution, adopted by the military in 2008, and until they are removed, domestic and international maneuvering will be necessary to pressure the military to change its violent ways.

This is not the first time that we have seen Myanmar’s Constitution fail its citizens. Despite her party winning the first open elections in a generation, Aung San Suu Kyi herself was denied the presidency under the Constitution. She and her party had to resort to creating a new position – State Counselor – that has made her the de facto leader of the government. It was a creative, and necessary, move to bring a just outcome to the election.

Similarly, the international investigation is a necessary move, given that Myanmar is missing the basic checks that a functioning democracy requires. Since October, the security forces have allegedly killed as many as 1,000 people and forced an estimated 77,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee their homes in northern Rakhine State to Bangladesh. These security forces are legally and factually controlled by the military. Continue Reading…

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March 28, 2017

Tomorrow, March 29: “Is there public reason in Strasbourg human rights analysis?”


Sadurski_Poster 1 (1)March 29, 2017

“Is there public reason in Strasbourg human rights analysis?”

A talk by Wojciech Sadurski, Challis Professor of Jurisprudence, University of Sydney Law School

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
WCC 3036

 

Please join us for a talk by Wojciech Sadurski, Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School, as well as the Challis Professor in Jurisprudence at the University of Sydney Law School, who will explore whether analysis by the European Court of Human Rights of permissible limitations on protected rights can be interpreted as consistent with the liberal ideal of public reason. He will examine the Court’s acceptance of asserted “legitimate goals” at face value, the application of the “necessity” requirement in a manner that makes it difficult to discern true legislative aims, and the puzzling case of “protection of morals” as a legitimate ground for the restriction of rights.

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March 27, 2017

Today, March 27: The struggle for women’s right to justice and equality in Muslim contexts


Masawah Poster_FinalMonday, March 27, 2017


“What Islam, whose Islam?:
The struggle for women’s right to justice and equality in Muslim contexts”

A talk by Zainah Anwar, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Musawah

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
WCC B015

Please join us for a talk by Zainah Anwar, of Musawah, who will speak on the challenges faced by women’s groups living in Muslim contexts and their struggle to reform laws and practices made in the name of Islam that discriminate against women. She will share the initiatives of activists and scholars who are engaged in the production of new feminist and rights-based knowledge in Islam, and their efforts at creating a public voice at the national and international levels,  pushing for the possibility and necessity of reform to uphold the principles of equality and justice.

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March 27, 2017

Apply to be a Wasserstein Fellow!


The Bernard Koteen Office of Public Interest Advising (OPIA) is soliciting applications and nominations for the 2017-2018 Wasserstein Fellows Program. The deadline is April 14, 2017.

Wasserstein Fellows are outstanding public interest lawyers who have shown a demonstrated facility for mentoring and spend 2-3 days at Harvard Law School advising students individually. They also speak to students in group settings and assist the OPIA staff in developing additional advising resources. Read more about 2-3 day Wasserstein Fellow responsibilities.

In addition, OPIA will once again host a Wasserstein Fellow-in-Residence with the Human Rights Program (HRP). The OPIA/HRP Wasserstein-Fellow-in-Residence will spend four months on the HLS campus (September – December) and will split his or her time between OPIA and HRP. Learn more about what the OPIA/HRP Wasserstein Fellow-in-Residence entails.

We encourage you to apply; to nominate colleagues, mentors, or mentees; and/or to circulate this email announcement among your public interest colleagues and friends.

If you have questions about the program, please don’t hesitate to contact Cathering Pattanayak, the Associate Director at OPIA, at cpattanayak@law.harvard.edu.

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March 22, 2017

Tomorrow, March 23: A film screening and discussion of Palestinian women living under the occupation


March 23, 2017


“Speed Sisters”:
Palestinian women living under the occupation

5:00- 7:00 p.m.
WCC 1023


Please join us for a screening of “Speed Sisters,” followed by a panel on Palestinian women living under the occupation. This is part of an ongoing film series sponsored by Islamic Legal Studies: Law and Social Change on women, rights and activism in the Muslim world.

The Speed Sisters are the first all-woman race car driving team in the Middle East. Grabbing headlines and turning heads at improvised tracks across the West Bank, these five women have sped their way into the heart of the gritty, male-dominated Palestinian street car-racing scene. Independent, determined and always on the move, they have deftly charted their own course through the pressures of social expectations, family dynamics, community politics and an ongoing Israeli military occupation.

Following the screening, our panelists Zena Agha, Rana Wahbe, and Nour Soubani will take a closer look at the complexities and vulnerabilities of Palestinian women’s lives under the Israeli occupation, offering personal perspectives and first-hand accounts.

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March 21, 2017

Today, March 21: Human rights in the U.S. under President Trump; Anti-impunity and the human rights agenda


HRWMarch 21, 2017

Human Rights in the U.S. Under President Trump

A talk by Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno,
Co-Director, U.S. Program, Human Rights Watch

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 3034
Harvard Law School

Lunch will be provided

Please join us for a talk with Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno, Co-Director of the U.S. Program for Human Rights Watch, on human rights in the U.S. under the Trump administration. She will reflect on the President’s policies that would harm rights protections, and his positions vis-à-vis institutions of law that are essential to the functioning of democracy. She will also discuss how Human Rights Watch is responding to these challenges, and consider broader questions arising about the role of the human rights movement today.

 

ALSO TODAY:

 

Event“Anti-Impunity and the Human Rights Agenda”

A book talk and panel discussion

5:00- 7:00 p.m.
Lewis 214A
Harvard Law School

 

In the 21st century, fighting impunity has become both the rallying cry and a metric of progress for human rights. The new emphasis on criminal prosecution represents a fundamental change in the positions and priorities of students and practitioners of human rights and transitional justice: it has become almost unquestionable common sense that criminal punishment is a legal, political, and pragmatic imperative for addressing human rights violations. A new collection from Cambridge University Press, Anti-Impunity and the Human Rights Agenda, challenges that common sense.

Please join us for a book talk by two of the book’s editors, Karen Engle, Professor, University of Texas at Austin School of Law, and Zinaida Miller, Assistant Professor, Seton Hall University, along with chapter authors Samuel Moyn, Professor, Harvard Law School, and Helena Alviar Garcia, Professor and former Dean, Los Andes Law School, Bogotá, for a discussion and celebration of the publication of Anti-Impunity and the Human Rights Agenda, chaired by Professor David Kennedy, Harvard Law School.

This event is being co-sponsored by the Institute for Global Law and Policy, the Human Rights Program, and the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice at the University of Texas, Austin.

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March 20, 2017

Moving on: Maureen Corrigan leaves HRP for fresh start in California

Posted by Cara Solomon

Just the other day, we said goodbye to one of the gentlest souls on the Harvard Law School Campus: Maureen Corrigan, HRP’s longtime financial manager, is headed to family and a new job in California.

Over the course of her years at HRP, Maureen navigated the increasingly complicated finances of a program that works not only with dozens of students and staff every year, but with visitors from around the world. It was not an easy job.

Maureen

Maureen Corrigan, our longtime financial manager, at left, with her fans from HRP.

The receipts alone would have done a lesser person in. They came to her ripped and wrinkled from around the world: scraps of paper with words written in Arabic, in Thai, in Bosnian, in illegible English. Maureen took them by the handful and calmly proceeded to trace them back to something expense-able, like dinner.

Certainly, there were predictable rhythms to her job, like the demands of budget season. But it was not uncommon to pass by her office, and hear the whirring and clacking of Maureen’s old-fashioned calculator as she tackled a problem one of us had dropped in her lap that day. With a plea that she solve it as soon as possible. While we panicked down the hall.

She always did, and in a way that put all of us at ease.

Mostly she did it with humor. Always she did it with heart.

It was no accident that Maureen volunteered to organize the birthday celebrations for everyone in the office. She was that kind of considerate. She knew the names of the people and the pets we loved. She asked after them, and after us, and offered hugs when we didn’t even know we needed them.

This is why, in the great East Coast/West Coast rivalry, none of us is pleased to cede Maureen to California. But she’s headed there for a job in the financial department of Chapman University, which happens to be exactly three blocks from her new house, where she will live with her husband, her two dogs, and her college senior son.

We wish her all the happiness she’s given us through the years, along with the very best luck life has to give.

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March 17, 2017

Monday, March 20: A year in: Examining Myanmar’s democratic transition


Myanmar_finalMarch 20, 2017

A Year In: Examining Myanmar’s Democratic Transition 

A talk by May Sabe Phyu,
Kachin leader and winner of “International Woman of Courage” award

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 4059
Harvard Law School

Lunch will be provided



Please join us for a talk by May Sabe Phyu, a Kachin leader and a winner of the State Department’s “International Woman of Courage” award. She will discuss efforts to prevent violence against women; the ongoing armed conflicts in Kachin and Shan States; and how peace activists are attempting to address entrenched militarization in the country.

This is the first talk in a two-part lunch series that looks at changes in Myanmar since Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy took power in the wake of the first free and open election in a generation. The series will examine the progress underway to protect human rights, achieve peace, and address the legacy of abuses and conflict in Myanmar dating back to the 1950s.

For the second talk, on April 10, Matthew Bugher, an HLS alumnus with investigative experience into international crimes in Myanmar, will discuss accountability efforts in the country, including a major investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity.

 

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