Blog: Events

September 10, 2018

TODAY, Sept. 11: Human Rights Program Orientation

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 1010

Join us for pizza and an overview of the Human Rights Program and how you can get involved! We’ll give you information on our International Human Rights Clinic; summer funding for human rights internships; post-graduate fellowships; events and conferences; and the larger human rights community at Harvard Law School. Then it’s your turn: mix and mingle with instructors from the Clinic, Visiting Fellows from the Academic Program, as well as representatives from student groups focused on human rights, such as HLS Advocates for Human Rights.

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April 17, 2018

Tomorrow, April 18: Judicial Legal Officers in International Courts and Tribunals


April 18, 2018

Judicial Legal Officers in International Courts and Tribunals

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 4063

When considering actors within international criminal tribunals, judges, prosecutors and defense attorneys readily come to mind. Often overlooked figures are legal officers working in Judges Chambers. Legal officers play a vital role in assisting investigations, managing pre-trial dockets, and drafting judgments. Priyanka Chirimar, Visiting Fellow at the Human Rights Program and OPIA Wasserstein Fellow-in-Residence, has served as a legal officer for the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia. She will discuss legal officers’ core duties, ethical obligations and challenges, and their role in norm building.

Sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Office of Public Interest Advising.  

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April 11, 2018

Tomorrow, April 12: Human Rights in the Council of Europe and the European Union

April 12, 2018

Human Rights in the Council of Europe and the European Union

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 3007

Dr. Steven Greer, Professor of Human Rights at the University of Bristol Law School, will discuss his new book, which examines the complex regional arrangements in Europe for the protection of human rights, where bodies of the European Union and the larger Council of Europe interact both as partners and competitors.  He and his co-authors show how the institutionalization of human rights has contributed to securing minimum standards across Europe.  They consider the central challenges to these institutions and how they could be managed, particularly for the U.K. in the post-Brexit era. Professor Greer will be joined by his co-authors, Professor Janneke Gerards from Utrecht University School of Law, and Rosie Slowe, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Bristol Law School.

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April 10, 2018

Tomorrow, April 11: Crimes Against Humanity in Mexico?


April 11, 2018

Crimes Against Humanity in Mexico?

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 3007

For a country that is not engaged in a conflict, statistics on homicide, enforced disappearances, and the use of torture in Mexico are staggering. Jimena Reyes, Director for the Americas at the International Federation for Human Rights and Visiting Fellow at the Human Rights Program, has documented these crimes and argued that some of these can be considered crimes against humanity. Examining the collusion between the Zetas drug cartel and the authorities in Coahuila, Reyes will explore the legal issues at stake and the political obstacles for accountability of those crimes including through an International Criminal Court investigation.

Co-sponsored by the Harvard University Mexican Association of Students and the Mexican Law Students Association.

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April 9, 2018

Tomorrow, April 10: The Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the Protection of LGBTQI Rights


April 10, 2018

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the Protection of LGBTQI Rights

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 2012

Lunch will be provided

Please join HLS Lambda for a discussion with Ana Helena Chacón, Vice President of Costa Rica, on the landmark Advisory Opinion 24 issued last January by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights regarding same-sex marriage and transgender rights. The Court resolved that same-sex couples should be recognized and guaranteed “all the rights that are derived from a family bond between people of the same sex” and that governments must guarantee access “to all existing forms of domestic legal systems, including the right to marriage, in order to ensure the protection of all the rights of families formed by same-sex couples without discrimination.” The Opinion sets precedent for 19 other Latin American and Caribbean countries that have agreed to abide by the Court’s decisions.

In addition to being the Vice President of Costa Rica, Madame Chacón acted as the Representative of Costa Rica in the case before the Inter-American Court and is globally recognized as a vocal champion for LGBT rights.

This event is being co-sponsored by La Alianza and the Harvard Women’s Law Association.

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April 4, 2018

Tomorrow, April 5: The World’s Oldest Form of Existing Discrimination


April 5, 2018

The World’s Oldest Form of Existing Discrimination

12 -1 pm
Hauser 102 – Malkins Classroom


P
lease join the South Asian Law Students Association, the International Human Rights Clinic, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights for “The World’s Oldest Form of Existing Discrimination,” a talk with Dr. Suraj Yengde, a Human Rights lawyer and Non-Resident Fellow at the W.E.B Du Bois Institute at the Hutchins Center at Harvard University. Dr. Yengde will discuss the ongoing ramifications of the caste system in contemporary India, with specific attention paid to the failure of international institutions and the international community to effectively condemn caste. Dr. Yengde’s talk will additionally touch on the role of colonialism in perpetuating anti-Dalit oppression in India, as well as the ways in which law students and lawyers can effectively combat caste-based discrimination.

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April 2, 2018

Tomorrow, April 3: International Religious Freedom in an Age of Nationalism

April 03, 2018

“International Religious Freedom in an Age of Nationalism”

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
Austin 100

Please join us for a discussion with Mustafa Akyol , author of “Islam Without Extremes: and Senior Fellow at the Freedom Project at Wellesley College; Brian Grim, founding President of the Religious Freedom & Business Foundation, and Co-editor of the World Religion Database; and Daniel Mark , Chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Villanova University.

Sponsored by the Catholic Law Students Association; Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change; Human Rights Program; Jewish Law Students Association; Christian Fellowship; DOS Grant Fund; and the Harvard Islamic Society.

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March 27, 2018

Tomorrow, March 28: Thailand’s Changing Role in the World Order


March 28, 2018

“Thailand: Shifting Ground Between the US and China”

A book talk by Benjamin Zawacki, former HRP Visiting Fellow

4:15 p.m.
1730 Cambridge St
S153, 1st floor, CGIS South
Cambridge, MA

Please join the Asia Center for a book talk with Benjamin Zawacki, author of “Thailand: Shifting Ground Between the U.S. and Rising China” and former HRP Visiting Fellow, and Professor Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University and Director of the Thai Studies Program at the Harvard University Asia Center.

This talk is being sponsored by the Thai Studies Program at the Asia Center, and co-sponsored by HRP.

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March 26, 2018

Tomorrow, March 27: The U.S. in Yemen


March 27, 2018

The U.S. in Yemen: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What That Means for Rights Protection

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 1019

 

The war in Yemen has been marred by frequent violations of the laws of war by all parties to the conflict, and a humanitarian crisis that has left millions at risk of famine and continuing cholera and diphtheria epidemics.  The United States is intimately engaged in this conflict, providing significant support to the Saudi-led coalition military campaign, carrying out unilateral strikes, and working in partnership with the UAE to counter Al-Qaeda. However, a lack of transparency about the ways in which the US is engaging in Yemen frustrates advocacy and accountability efforts.

This talk by Kristine Beckerle, Yemen and UAE Researcher, Human Rights Watch, will examine the US role in Yemen and explore the legal and policy avenues through which rights advocates can push for rights-respecting policies and practices, both in the context of Yemen as well as counter-terror efforts in the MENA region more broadly.

Hosted by the Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change and co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program, the Middle Eastern Law Students Association, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. Lunch will be served.

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March 21, 2018

Conference preview: Gerald L. Neuman on “Human Rights in a Time of Populism”


Earlier this week, Gerald L. Neuman, Co-Director of the Human Rights Program (HRP), and the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law at Harvard Law School, sat down to discuss HRP’s upcoming conference, “Human Rights in a Time of Populism,” with Natalie McCauley, JD ‘19.

Natalie McCauley, JD ’19, interviews Prof. Gerald L. Neuman, Co-Director of HRP, on FB Live about his upcoming conference on populism and human rights.

The conference, which is free and open to the public, takes place this Friday afternoon and Saturday all day on Harvard Law School’s campus.

So Professor, to start us out: What is this conference about?

Thank you for asking. We plan to discuss the current rise in populism: What are its causes? What are its effects? What implications does it have for the international human rights system? And how should the international human rights system respond?

We don’t expect the answers to these questions to be the same for every country, and that’s one of the things we’re going to be discussing.

We’ll have more than a dozen leading experts coming from as far away as The Philippines and as near as our own university. There will be specific discussion on the United States, Poland, Southeast Asia, Turkey, and Latin America, as well as cross-cutting themes.

I should clarify what I mean by populism. Political scientists offer different formulations for the notion of populism, as we’ll be discussing. The phenomenon of concern here is a kind of politics that employs an exclusionary notion of the people- the “real people,” as opposed to disfavored groups that are unworthy. Populist leaders then claim to rule on behalf of the “real people,” whose will should not be constrained.

And does this populism affect internationally protected human rights?

We plan to discuss examples of how that happens. But the easy answer is: Yes, it does. Certainly within the country, and it in cases it has implications for other countries as well. If we look internally, often populism then leads to targeting the excluded groups. But it also poses a danger to the majority. Populists deny the legitimacy of the political opposition. They often try to entrench themselves in power and undermine checks. Populism can tip over into authoritarianism.

We’re talking about examples in Poland, Duterte in the Philippines, and of course, President Trump here. Continue Reading…