Blog: Events

March 26, 2018

Tomorrow, March 27: The U.S. in Yemen


March 27, 2018

The U.S. in Yemen: What We Know, What We Don’t, and What That Means for Rights Protection

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 1019

 

The war in Yemen has been marred by frequent violations of the laws of war by all parties to the conflict, and a humanitarian crisis that has left millions at risk of famine and continuing cholera and diphtheria epidemics.  The United States is intimately engaged in this conflict, providing significant support to the Saudi-led coalition military campaign, carrying out unilateral strikes, and working in partnership with the UAE to counter Al-Qaeda. However, a lack of transparency about the ways in which the US is engaging in Yemen frustrates advocacy and accountability efforts.

This talk by Kristine Beckerle, Yemen and UAE Researcher, Human Rights Watch, will examine the US role in Yemen and explore the legal and policy avenues through which rights advocates can push for rights-respecting policies and practices, both in the context of Yemen as well as counter-terror efforts in the MENA region more broadly.

Hosted by the Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change and co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program, the Middle Eastern Law Students Association, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. Lunch will be served.

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March 21, 2018

Conference preview: Gerald L. Neuman on “Human Rights in a Time of Populism”


Earlier this week, Gerald L. Neuman, Co-Director of the Human Rights Program (HRP), and the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law at Harvard Law School, sat down to discuss HRP’s upcoming conference, “Human Rights in a Time of Populism,” with Natalie McCauley, JD ‘19.

Natalie McCauley, JD ’19, interviews Prof. Gerald L. Neuman, Co-Director of HRP, on FB Live about his upcoming conference on populism and human rights.

The conference, which is free and open to the public, takes place this Friday afternoon and Saturday all day on Harvard Law School’s campus.

So Professor, to start us out: What is this conference about?

Thank you for asking. We plan to discuss the current rise in populism: What are its causes? What are its effects? What implications does it have for the international human rights system? And how should the international human rights system respond?

We don’t expect the answers to these questions to be the same for every country, and that’s one of the things we’re going to be discussing.

We’ll have more than a dozen leading experts coming from as far away as The Philippines and as near as our own university. There will be specific discussion on the United States, Poland, Southeast Asia, Turkey, and Latin America, as well as cross-cutting themes.

I should clarify what I mean by populism. Political scientists offer different formulations for the notion of populism, as we’ll be discussing. The phenomenon of concern here is a kind of politics that employs an exclusionary notion of the people- the “real people,” as opposed to disfavored groups that are unworthy. Populist leaders then claim to rule on behalf of the “real people,” whose will should not be constrained.

And does this populism affect internationally protected human rights?

We plan to discuss examples of how that happens. But the easy answer is: Yes, it does. Certainly within the country, and it in cases it has implications for other countries as well. If we look internally, often populism then leads to targeting the excluded groups. But it also poses a danger to the majority. Populists deny the legitimacy of the political opposition. They often try to entrench themselves in power and undermine checks. Populism can tip over into authoritarianism.

We’re talking about examples in Poland, Duterte in the Philippines, and of course, President Trump here. Continue Reading…

March 12, 2018

LISTEN: Criminal Abortion in the United States


Earlier this month, we welcomed Carol Sanger, Visiting Professor at HLS and Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, and Mindy Roseman, Director of International Programs and Director of the Gruber Program for Global Justice and Women’s Rights at Yale Law School, for a timely and compelling conversation about human rights and the criminal punishment of abortion. Below is the full audio of their conversation.

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March 7, 2018

Friday, March 9: Jerusalem after Trump: Consequences and Implications



 Friday, March 9, 2018

“Jerusalem After Trump: Consequences and Implications”

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

WCC 2012

President Trump’s December 6, 2017 declaration of the recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel sparked wide international condemnation and protest — and widespread approval in Israel. A highly sensitive issue with profound legal, geopolitical, spiritual, and humanitarian consequences, the status of Jerusalem has serious implications for the elusive goal of Middle East peace.  In this event, Aaron David Miller and Noura Erakat will engage in a conversation on the consequences and implications of Trump’s decision from a number of different angles, taking into consideration questions of international law, regional stability and security, prospects for sustainable peace, as well as the status and rights of Palestinians in East Jerusalem. Noah Feldman will moderate.

This event is organized by The Julis-Rabinowitz Program on Jewish and Israeli Law & The Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change, and co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program.

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February 28, 2018

Tomorrow, March 1: Criminal Abortion in the U.S.


March 1, 2018

“Criminal Abortion in the U.S.”

11:45- 12:45 p.m.
WCC 2004

Please join us for a lunch talk on human rights and the criminal punishment of abortion with Carol Sanger, Austin Wakeman Scott Visiting Professor of Law at HLS and Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, and Mindy Roseman, Director of International Programs and Director of the Gruber Program for Global Justice and Women’s Rights at Yale Law School.

Despite Vice President Pence’s pledge to consign Roe v. Wade to the “ash heap of history,” there are signs that many Americans would not support the re-criminalization of abortion. Professor Sanger will discuss this evidence and raise questions about the criminal punishment of abortion, such as why pregnant woman have not been subject to criminal abortion laws in the U.S. and whether the current administration and red state politicians actually want Roe V. Wade to be overturned. Dr. Roseman will situate the U.S. experience within a global context by discussing criminal abortion in other countries and examining the treatment of criminal abortion under international human rights law.

This event is being co-sponsored by the HLS Criminal Justice Policy Program, the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics, and HLS Students for Reproductive Justice.

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February 26, 2018

Conference next week: “Humanitarian Disarmament: The Way Ahead”


March 5 – 6, 2018

“Humanitarian Disarmament: The Way Ahead”

Inaugural Conference of the Armed Conflict
and Civilian Protection Initiative
at Harvard Law School

12 – 1:30 p.m.
Austin 100 (North), Harvard Law School
Lunch will be served.

Please join us for a conference that brings together international experts in humanitarian disarmament, a movement that strives to end civilian suffering caused by inhumane and indiscriminate weapons. Drawing on first-hand experience in creating international law, conference participants will discuss how the movement has developed over the past two decades and explore where it should go from here.

The conference will include two public events: a keynote conversation with leaders of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning campaigns to ban nuclear weapons and landmines; and a panel that examines current issues in humanitarian disarmament, including efforts to end the urban use of certain explosive weapons, reduce the environmental impact of armed conflict, ban killer robots, and control the unlawful arms trade.

Humanitarian Disarmament: The Way Ahead will launch the Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative, which is housed in Harvard Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC). The conference is co-organized by IHRC, the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, and Harvard Kennedy School’s Carr Center for Human Rights Policy.

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February 22, 2018

Tomorrow, Feb. 23: Elliot Shrage, Facebook’s VP, Global Communications, Marketing, and Public Policy


Friday, February 23, 2018

A Talk by Elliot Schrage, VP, Global Communications, Marketing, and Public Policy, Facebook

11:45 a.m. – 12: 45 p.m.
WCC 2012

Lunch will be served.

Please join us for a lunch talk with Elliot Schrage, JD ’86, Vice President of Global Communications, Marketing, and Public Policy at Facebook. Schrage will discuss how corporations like Facebook take human rights into account in their business practices.

This event is being co-sponsored by the Harvard Human Rights and Business Law Students Association.

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February 21, 2018

Tomorrow, Feb. 22: Russia’s “Gay Propaganda Law” and LGBTQ Rights


Thursday, February 22, 2018

Russia’s “Gay Propaganda Law” and LGBTQ Rights

11:45 a.m.- 12:45 p.m.
WCC 1010

Lunch will be served.

 

Please join us for a talk with Melissa Hooper, Director of Human Rights and Civil Society at Human Rights First, on Russia’s global efforts to promote “traditional values” that curtail the rights of LGBTQ people. This agenda is demonstrated in the “gay propaganda law” which penalizes those who share ideas about the equal value of same-sex relationships to children. In addition, Russia has advocated for U.N. resolutions, and supported legislatures in other countries to pass laws that favor “family values” over the human rights of LGBTQ, women, and others. This talk will also consider how U.S. actors are supporting Russia to advance these policies.

This event is co-sponsored by HLS Advocates for Human Rights, the Harvard Human Rights Journal, and HLS Lambda.

 

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February 20, 2018

Tomorrow, Feb. 21: The ambitions of Muslim family law reform


Please join the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender tomorrow, Feb. 21, for a talk on Muslim family law reform featuring clinical instructor Salma Waheedi and Prof. Kristen Stilt, Faculty Director of the Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change.  The event begins at noon in WCC B015, with a plant-based lunch served.

Stilt and Waheedi will discuss their upcoming Journal of Law & Gender article examining reform efforts in family law in Muslim countries. They will discuss how change in family law can be achieved through arguments based on or justified by Islamic law. They will present and analyze legal strategies of family law reform and identify the possibilities and the limitations of each strategy. Their upcoming article is directed towards scholars and practitioners who seek a deeper understanding of the tools of change in Muslim family law.

This event is organized by the Journal of Law & Gender and co-sponsored by the Women’s Law Association, Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change, and the Muslim Law Students Association. 

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February 16, 2018

Tuesday, Feb. 20: How to fix finance by saving human rights


Tuesday, February 20, 2018

“How to fix finance by saving human rights”

A talk by David Kinley, Chair, Human Rights Law, University of Sydney

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Milstein West B
Harvard Law School

Lunch will be served

Please join us for a talk by Professor David Kinley, Chair in Human Rights Law at the University of Sydney and an Academic Expert Member of Doughty Street Chambers in London. He is a former Fulbright Senior Scholar at American University Washington College of Law, and has taught at Oxford and George Washington Universities, as well as the Sorbonne. He specializes in the area of the global economy and human rights and has worked for more than 25 years with governments, international organizations, law firms, corporations and NGOs in the field. His forthcoming book, Necessary Evil: How to Fix Finance by Saving Human Rights (Oxford University Press), investigates the incredible impact the financial system has on human rights.

This event is being co-sponsored by International Legal Studies.

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