Blog: Fellowships

May 23, 2018

Spotlight Feature: Volz, Jung win David Grossman Exemplary Clinical Student Award


This piece originally appeared as a spotlight feature on Harvard Law School’ s Today homepage on May 22, 2018, written by Ian Spaho.

In recognition of their demonstrated excellence in representing clients and undertaking advocacy or policy reform projects, Amy Volz ’18 and Ha Ryong Jung (Michael) ’18 were named the 2018 recipients of the David A. Grossman Exemplary Clinical Student Award at Harvard Law School. The award is named in honor of the late Clinical Professor David Grossman ’88, a public interest lawyer dedicated to providing high-quality legal services to low income communities.

 

Amy Volz


Credit: Lorin Granger

Described by nominators as “the embodiment of Grossman’s tireless pro bono spirit,” Volz contributed thousands of hours of pro bono service to clients through the Harvard Immigration Project (HIP), the International Human Rights Clinic, and the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program (HIRC).

At HLS, Volz co-founded the Immigration Response Initiative, a student group comprised of nearly 400 students. The Immigration Response Initiative focused on more than a dozen projects, including legal research for the American Civil Liberties Union; state and local advocacy for immigrant-friendly policies; and support for HIRC’s litigation efforts to stop the Muslim Ban. Volz wrote answers to frequently-asked-questions related to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and helped organize DACA renewal clinics for members of the Harvard community. She also drafted portions of an amicus brief to stop President Trump’s Executive Order from cutting refugee admissions. She did all of this work pro bono without receiving any academic credit.

Volz also put together a noteworthy report detailing a range of issues, including detention, denial of parole or release from detention, criminalization of asylum seekers, and the expansion of expedited removal proceedings. The report became the basis for a request for a hearing before the Inter-American Commission and litigation before the Canadian courts.

“Amy is a consummate professional and clear communicator who is thoughtful about her role as well as her place on a team. She listens effectively but, at the same time, she is always prepared to offer her opinions and ideas,” wrote her nominators from the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program. “She is smart, enthusiastic, thoughtful, and totally reliable.”

Her commitment to social justice is also evident in her work with the International Human Rights Clinic, where she worked for two years. Throughout this time, she worked on a complicated lawsuit, Mamani, et al. v. Sánchez de Lozada and Sánchez Berzaín, which was litigated in U.S. federal court on behalf of the family members of Bolivian citizens who were killed by the Bolivian military in 2003. The suit brought claims against Boliva’s former president and minister of defense for their roles in orchestrating these killings. In April, the jury returned a verdict in favor of the families, awarding them $10 million.

“Volz was involved in all aspects of the litigation and her work was nothing short of outstanding. She developed a deep, detailed knowledge of a very intricate case, from the most minute factual details to larger strategic decisions, a testament to not only her intelligence but also her commitment,” her nominators wrote.

“Her ability to connect with people in such a meaningful way, combined with her deep understanding of the case and the evidence that we needed to provide at trial, helped us elicit the testimony that we needed to prove our case from multiple difficult witnesses,” said Clinical Professor of Law and Co-Director of the International Human Rights Clinic Susan Farbstein, who also nominated Volz.

“I am incredibly honored to be a recipient of this award and grateful for the many opportunities I have had to get involved in clinical and SPO work at HLS,” said Volz. “Working with amazing mentors in the Immigration & Refugee Clinical Program and the International Human Rights Clinic has been the greatest gift of my time in law school. I am excited to carry on the lessons I have learned here as I begin my career.”

 

Ha Ryong Jung (Michael)


Credit: Lorin Granger

Ha Ryong Jung, a native of South Korea, was recognized for his unparalleled commitment to clinical education and the field of children’s rights. At HLS, he contributed more than 2,000 pro bono hours with the International Human Rights ClinicChild Advocacy Clinic, and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. He also worked pro bono at the regional office of the United Nations Children’s Fund in Thailand, Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, Boston Juvenile Court, and Volunteer Lawyers Project.

“Jung has spent the better part of his lifetime building his capacity to promote the human rights of children, particularly the neediest children,” wrote his nominators in the Child Advocacy Program. They noted that his clinical and academic work were outstanding, showing a drive to learn, intellectual curiosity, and the ability to make connections.

In the Child Advocacy Clinic, Jung received special recognition for his important contributions to his placement organization and the quality of his participation and engagement in the clinic seminar. He worked on laws and policies affecting children and young people, including those undergoing removal proceedings and experiencing custody complications due to undocumented parents facing deportation. “His thoughtful and reflective contributions made him a beloved member of his fieldwork office and the class,” wrote his nominators.

Jung has taken his clinical experiences and infused them into other aspects of his law school life. He is the first student to complete the Harvard-wide Child Protection Certificate Program administered by the Harvard François-Xavier Bagnoud (FXB) Center for Health and Human Rights at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Additionally, he re-ignited HLS’ student group Child & Youth Advocates, organizing events and skills-based training related to child welfare, education, and juvenile justice. He also created a student database to encourage networking among HLS students and graduates interested in the field of child advocacy.

One of his most impressive accomplishments, according to his nominators, was establishing the Child Advocacy Hub, which connects organizations working on children’s issues to law students interested in working remotely on short-term projects. Seeing an unmet need in the legal services community for additional help, and a desire on the part of HLS students to volunteer, Jung came up with the idea of matching the two groups. With this vision and his exceptional organizational and leadership skills, he reached out to stakeholders and launched the Hub in early 2018. “Jung’s efforts were driven by his ability to identify a problem and solve it, and also by his deep drive to ensure that the range of opportunities to gain skills and participate in child advocacy-oriented activities for current and future HLS students is as robust as possible,” wrote his nominators.

“Jung is truly a one-of-a-kind person and student, and he is undoubtedly going to make significant contributions to the field of children’s rights once he begins his career,” his nominators concluded.

Reflecting on his three years at HLS Jung said, “When I was notified about this award, my first reaction was one of puzzlement and amazement because I knew so many students who were deserving of an award, and I never considered myself to fit that definition. However, the feelings that followed were of immense gratitude and honor with the understanding that the individuals I deeply admire had recognized my work as contributing to the lives of children and trusted that my efforts will firmly persist. I feel blessed to have been a part of the International Human Rights Clinic and the Child Advocacy Clinic for most of my time in law school, and those experiences have undoubtedly taken me a step closer to becoming an effective advocate for children. This award is the greatest gift that I have received, and it will serve to be an immeasurably valuable source of support and encouragement for me as I continue my pursuit of helping to protect children and their rights.”

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March 15, 2018

Apply to Be a Joint Wasserstein-Human Rights Program Fellow for Fall 2018 Semester


The Human Rights Program and Office of Public Interest Advising (OPIA) at Harvard Law School will jointly host one Wasserstein Fellow-in-Residence who will spend four months on the HLS campus (September through December 2018), and split their time between OPIA and HRP. At OPIA, the fellow will advise students about international public interest and human rights careers and assist OPIA staff in developing advising resources.  At HRP, the fellow will devote the majority of their time to research and writing on a specific human rights topic, and be a member of its community of visiting fellows.

The Human Rights Program’s Visiting Fellows Program seeks to give thoughtful individuals with a demonstrated commitment to human rights an opportunity to step back and conduct a serious inquiry in the human rights field. Individuals who become fellows at the Program are usually scholars with a substantial background in human rights, or experienced activists. The fellows form an essential part of the human rights community at Harvard Law School and participate actively in the Human Rights Program Fellows Colloquium—each fellow makes a presentation to Human Rights Program staff, faculty, and other fellows on at least one occasion. Fellows are also encouraged to participate in a number of other Human Rights Program activities.

Please see OPIA’s website for additional information about the program, and details on how to apply to be a joint Wasserstein Fellow-in-Residence with OPIA and the Human Rights Program. The deadline to apply is April 13, 2018.

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February 9, 2018

Monday, Feb. 12: Fundamental rights and impact legislation in Pakistan


Monday, February 12, 2018

“Fundamental Rights and Impact Litigation in Pakistan”

A talk by Visiting Fellow Yasser Latif Hamdani

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 3017

Please join Human Rights Program Visiting Fellow Yasser Latif Hamdani for a talk on fundamental rights litigation under the Pakistani Constitution. Hamdani will discuss his personal experience as an Advocate of the High Courts of Pakistan, including litigating landmark internet freedom cases. This will cover cases involving YouTube and Blackberry and ongoing challenges under domestic legislation.

Co-sponsored by the Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change, the Human Rights Program, and the South Asian Law Students Association

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January 18, 2018

Next Thursday, Jan. 25: Informational Session on HRP’s Post-Graduate Fellowships


We look forward to seeing you at next Thursday’s informational session on HRP’s post-graduate fellowships, which have advising deadlines in February, and submission deadlines in March! Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about Henigson and Satter fellowships, which provide an invaluable opportunity to work with human rights organizations after graduation.

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December 18, 2017

HRP Summer Fellowships: Deadline Approaching!


Every summer, the Human Rights Program funds internships at NGOs and government agencies for several law students who are considering human rights work as a career. HRP’s Summer Fellowship is open to JD students going into their 2L or 3L years and some LLMs.

The summer fellowship is a particularly great opportunity for those considering advanced human rights studies during the remainder of law school, and then careers in human rights.

“Human rights work is very rewarding but also challenging,” HRP Associate Director Emily Keehn said. “The summer fellowship enables students to gain substantial field experience, which is critical to the development of their human rights careers.”

Applications are due February 1, 2018; students must meet with Emily before applying.

To get a sense of the range of opportunities, here’s where our 2017 summer fellows worked:

Allie Brudney, JD ’19, worked at the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe in the Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights; Niku Jafarnia, JD ’19, worked at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Ankara, Turkey; Alisan Oliver-Li, JD ’19, worked at the Legal Assistance Centre in Windoek, Namibia; Claudia Torres, LLM’16/SJD’20, worked in Mexico City at Brigada Callejera de Apoyo a la Mujer “Elisa Martinez,” an organization advocating for low-income sex workers’ human rights and civil liberties; Thaya Uthayophas, JD ’18, worked at Privacy International, a London-based organization advocating for the right to privacy across the world; and Evelyn Zheng, JD’18, worked at Justice Base, a Yangon-based organization that aims to promote the rule of law in transitional and post-conflict societies.

Emily will be available throughout January to advise students in-person. Please also feel free to email her (ekeehn@law.harvard.edu) with any questions. Detailed information on the application process can be found on HRP’s website.

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November 16, 2017

HRP invites applications for its 2018-2019 Visiting Fellows Program

Posted by Emily Nagisa Keehn


The Human Rights Program invites applications for its Visiting Fellows Program for the 2018-2019 academic year. The Visiting Fellows Program gives individuals with a demonstrated commitment to human rights an opportunity to step back and conduct a serious inquiry in the human rights field. Visiting Fellows are usually scholars with a substantial background in human rights, experienced activists, or members of the judiciary or other branches of government.

Typically, fellows come from outside the U.S., and spend from one semester to a full academic year in residence at Harvard Law School, where they devote the majority of their time to research and writing on a human rights topic. The Program currently has a particular interest in fellows working on the United Nations Treaty Bodies in their research, though applications are not limited in this regard.

The fellows form an essential part of the human rights community at Harvard Law School, and participate in the Human Rights Program’s bi-monthly Visiting Fellows Colloquium, as well as a number of other activities.

The Human Rights Program provides approximately four fellows annually with a shared office space, access to computers, and use of the Harvard library system. As a general matter, the Human Rights Program does not fund fellows. However, applicants who are nationals of low or middle income countries are eligible for the Eleanor Roosevelt Fellowship, which offers a stipend to help defray the cost of living.  In order to profit from the fellowship, fluent spoken English is essential.

The deadline to submit applications is February 1, 2018. Click here for more information on how to apply or write to Emily Nagisa Keehn, the Associate Director of the Academic Program, at ekeehn@law.harvard.edu.

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March 27, 2017

Apply to be a Wasserstein Fellow!


The Bernard Koteen Office of Public Interest Advising (OPIA) is soliciting applications and nominations for the 2017-2018 Wasserstein Fellows Program. The deadline is April 14, 2017.

Wasserstein Fellows are outstanding public interest lawyers who have shown a demonstrated facility for mentoring and spend 2-3 days at Harvard Law School advising students individually. They also speak to students in group settings and assist the OPIA staff in developing additional advising resources. Read more about 2-3 day Wasserstein Fellow responsibilities.

In addition, OPIA will once again host a Wasserstein Fellow-in-Residence with the Human Rights Program (HRP). The OPIA/HRP Wasserstein-Fellow-in-Residence will spend four months on the HLS campus (September – December) and will split his or her time between OPIA and HRP. Learn more about what the OPIA/HRP Wasserstein Fellow-in-Residence entails.

We encourage you to apply; to nominate colleagues, mentors, or mentees; and/or to circulate this email announcement among your public interest colleagues and friends.

If you have questions about the program, please don’t hesitate to contact Cathering Pattanayak, the Associate Director at OPIA, at cpattanayak@law.harvard.edu.

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January 26, 2017

Tomorrow, Jan. 27: Post-Graduate Fellowship Information Session

January 27, 2017

Informational Session on Post-Graduate Fellowships

12:00- 1:00 p.m.
WCC 4059



Please join us for an informational session on post-graduate fellowships in human rights. We will discuss the application process for the Satter Human Rights Fellowship and the Henigson Human Rights Fellowship, both of which have deadlines in March. Faculty and staff from the Human Rights Program and OPIA will be present to workshop your fellowship project and placement ideas.

This event is sponsored by the Human Rights Program. Pizza will be served.

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November 23, 2016

HRP invites applications for its 2017-2018 Visiting Fellows Program

Posted by Emily Keehn

The Human Rights Program invites applications for its Visiting Fellows Program in the 2017-2018 academic year. The Visiting Fellows Program gives individuals with a demonstrated commitment to human rights an opportunity to step back and conduct a serious inquiry in the human rights field. Visiting Fellows are usually scholars with a substantial background in human rights, experienced activists, or members of the judiciary or other branches of government.

Typically, fellows come from outside the U.S., and spend from one semester to a full academic year in residence at Harvard Law School, where they devote the majority of their time to research and writing on a human rights topic. The Program currently has a preference for fellows working on the United Nations Treaty Bodies in their research, though applications are not limited in this regard.

The fellows form an essential part of the human rights community at Harvard Law School, and participate in the Human Rights Program’s bi-monthly Visiting Fellows Colloquium, as well as a number of other activities.

The Human Rights Program provides approximately four fellows annually with a shared office space, access to computers, and use of the Harvard library system. As a general matter, the Human Rights Program does not fund fellows. However, applicants who are nationals of low or middle income countries are eligible for the Eleanor Roosevelt Fellowship, which offers a stipend to help defray the cost of living.  In order to profit from the fellowship, fluent spoken English is essential.

The deadline to submit applications is February 1, 2017. Click here for more information on how to apply.

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August 22, 2016

HRP Welcomes New Associate Director for Academic Program

Posted by Gerald Neuman

Today I have the honor of announcing an exciting new appointment at the Human Rights Program. Emily Nagisa Keehn has joined HRP as Associate Director for the Academic Program.  Emily is a dynamic and skillful human rights lawyer, who will bring leadership and experience to the work of the Academic Program, and who looks forward to developing strong relationships with our students.  She will also act as an important liaison between the HRP Academic Program and other parts of the Law School and the University.

Emily Nagisa Keehn

Emily Nagisa Keehn

Emily joins the Human Rights Program from Sonke Gender Justice in Cape Town, where she was the head of policy development and advocacy. In this role, she directed strategic litigation, research, parliamentary engagement, and advocacy pertaining to human rights, gender, and HIV. She primarily focuses on human rights issues at the intersection of criminal justice, gender, and health.

Previously, Emily worked for UCLA School of Law, where she developed and ran a post-graduate legal fellowship for Southern African public interest lawyers, culminating in an LL.M. and a one-year work placement with a human rights organization. Emily’s experience spans Southern Africa, Southeast Asia, Israel and the U.S. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of California, San Diego, and a J.D. from UCLA School of Law.

At HRP, Emily will play a substantive and managerial role in innovating and implementing academic activities, including the speaker series, conferences, and the Academic Program’s various fellowships.

We welcome her warmly and look forward to your meeting her soon.