Blog: John Leso

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August 24, 2015

Beyond the APA: The Role of Psychology Boards and State Courts in Propping up Torture

Posted by Deborah Popowski

This post was originally published on Just Security

The image of torture in US popular culture is an intimate one: a government agent and a suspect in a dark cell, usually alone. But the reality of our state-sanctioned torture program is that it took a village, working in broad daylight, to pull it off.

This summer, all eyes are on the American Psychological Association, as they should be. An independent investigation commissioned by the APA found that the organization had, as David Luban describes here, engaged “in a decade of duplicity to permit its members to participate in abusive interrogations while seeming to forbid it.” The report, lead-authored by former prosecutor David Hoffman, tells a tale of wholesale corruption and cooptation. Among its explosive findings is that APA officials refused to act on ethics complaints against military and CIA psychologists so as to shield them from sanction.

But the APA was not the only institution asked to investigate these matters. State licensing boards in Ohio, New York, Texas, Louisiana, and Alabama also received credible, well-documented complaints against implicated psychologists, including many of the same subjects of the improperly dismissed APA complaints. As lawyer and advisor for Dr. Trudy Bond and other courageous complainants in many of these cases, I witnessed how the licensing boards, like the APA, stonewalled and refused to bring formal charges, offering opaque, implausible, or seemingly pretextual justifications for their decisions. 

According to the Hoffman report, ethics director Stephen Behnke told investigators that the duty to protect the public fell not on the APA, but on the state licensing boards. The truth is that the responsibility is shared — and so is their failure.

Licensing boards are legally mandated to protect people from the unsafe practice of psychology. This includes patients, all people with whom psychologists work, and the broader public. Yet, presented with evidence that their licensees had participated in or enabled torture, these state boards seemed to turn a blind eye. To truly understand how a profession dedicated to healing came to sanction brutality, we need a full investigation into how and why these boards dismissed misconduct complaints against psychologists James Mitchell, John Leso, Larry James, and Diane Zierhoffer. Did the state boards handle these complaints properly and in good faith, or did they, like the APA, strain their reading of the law to reach conclusions that would not restrict the government’s interrogation program — even if it included torture and cruelty? To what extent did they rely on compromised APA ethics policies and the now-discredited officials responsible for them?

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March 31, 2011

Oral Arguments in GITMO Psychologist Case Take Place in NY Next Week

Posted by Cara Solomon

Here’s an important advisory from  the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA) and the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU).  For more on professional misconduct complaints, see our page on the topic here.

UPDATE:  Courthouse News Service ran an article about the hearing under the headline “Court Shrinks from Probe of Gitmo Psychologist.”  Also, in advance of the hearing, Amy Goodman of Democracy Now wrote a column about it, and interviewed the complainant in the case, Dr. Steven Reisner.

MEDIA ADVISORY

ORAL ARGUMENTS IN GITMO PSYCHOLOGIST CASE TAKE PLACE IN NEW YORK NEXT WEEK

In the First Court Hearing in the U.S. on Whether a Psychologist’s Participation in Abusive Interrogations Violates Professional Ethical Standards, CJA and the NYCLU Seek Court Order Mandating an Investigation of Dr. John Francis Leso for Conduct at Guantánamo

WHO: Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA), New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU)

WHAT: CJA and NYCLU have asked a New York State Court to order the New York Department of Education’s Office of Professional Discipline (OPD) to investigate a professional misconduct complaint alleging that Dr. John Francis Leso, a New York-licensed psychologist, violated New York’s professional ethics standards when he designed and participated in the abusive interrogation program at Guantánamo.  The OPD is responsible for regulating the conduct of all New York licensed psychologists and hears all manner of complaints against New York psychologists.

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