THE ONLINE HOME OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS PROGRAM & INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CLINIC

Blog: Gender Equality

November 22, 2016

VIDEO: Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland, speaks at joint conference on climate change displacement


We’re so pleased today to share coverage of our recent joint conference, “Climate Change Displacement: Finding Solutions to an Emerging Crisis,” which brought together experts from around the world to discuss the governance challenges that come with this critical issue. Thanks again to the Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic and the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic for partnering with us on this conference, which was comprised of closed meetings and two public events.

Mary Robinson speaks in front of a backdrop covered in Harvard Law School's logo.
Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland, in conversation with HLS Dean Martha Minow.

Below, you’ll find the video of the first event: a conversation between Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland and current UN special envoy on El Niño and climate change, and Dean Martha Minow. Harvard Law School has posted a summary of that talk, along with some excerpts, on the home page.

The Harvard Gazette also went in-depth with one of the conference attendees, Robin Bronen, a human rights attorney, senior research scientist at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and co-founder and executive director of the Alaska Institute for Justice. Robin participated in the second public event, entitled “Addressing Climate Change Globally and Locally.” You’ll also find video of that event below.

Thanks to all of the conference participants, and to the many other scholars, advocates, and affected communities who are working so hard on this issue.

Share By Email

loading
Close

October 25, 2016

Commentary: Justice is long overdue for the widows of South African mineworkers


We’re very pleased to cross-post this piece by Emily Nagisa Keehn, Associate Director of HRP’s Academic Program, who argues in The Guardian that it’s vital the court of appeals uphold a ruling that makes South Africa’s gold mining industry accountable to women whose husbands died from silicosis. Emily co-authored the piece with her former colleague, Dean Peacock, Executive Director of Sonke Gender Justice in South Africa.

Continue Reading…

Share By Email

loading
Close

September 20, 2016

The Clinic Welcomes New Advocacy Fellows

Posted by Cara Solomon

Now that we’re in the rhythm of the semester, it’s time to introduce some new faces in the International Human Rights Clinic. We’re thrilled to welcome five new clinical advocacy fellows, all accomplished lawyers with different expertise and experiences. They’re leading clinical projects this semester on a range of new topics, from human rights protection in investment treaties to armed conflict and the environment.

The Clinic's new advocacy fellows, from top right: Rebecca Agule, Yee Htun, Fola Adeleke, Juan Pablo Calderon-Meza, and Salma Waheedi.
The Clinic’s new advocacy fellows, from top left: Rebecca Agule, Yee Htun, Fola Adeleke, Juan Pablo Calderon-Meza, and Salma Waheedi.

In alphabetical order, here they are:

Fola Adeleke is a South African-trained lawyer who specializes in international economic law and human rights, corporate transparency, open government and accountability within the extractives industry. This semester, his projects focus on human rights protection in investment treaties and reconfiguring the licensing process of mining to include more consultation with communities.

Rebecca Agule, an alumna of the Clinic, is an American lawyer who specializes in the impact of conflict and violence upon individuals, communities, and the environment. This semester, her project focuses on armed conflict and the environment, with a focus on victim assistance.

Juan Pablo Calderón-Meza, a former Visiting Fellow with the Human Rights Program, is a Colombian attorney whose practice specializes in international law and human rights advocacy and litigation. This semester, his project focuses on accountability for corporations and executives that facilitated human rights abuses and atrocity crimes.

Yee Htun is the Director of  the Myanmar Program for Justice Trust, a legal non-profit that partners with lawyers and activists to strengthen communities fighting for justice and human rights. Born in Myanmar and trained as a lawyer in Canada, Yee specializes in gender justice and working on behalf of refugee and migrant communities. This semester, her project focuses on women advocates in Myanmar.

Salma Waheedi is an attorney who specializes in international human rights law, Islamic law, gender justice, family law, comparative constitutional law, and refugee and asylum law. Born in Bahrain and trained as a lawyer in the U.S., Salma currently holds a joint appointment with Harvard Law School’s Islamic Legal Studies Program, where she focuses on family relations in Islamic jurisprudence. This semester, her project focuses on gender justice under Islam.

We’re so pleased to have the fellows as part of our community this semester. Please swing by at some point to introduce yourself and say hello.

Share By Email

loading
Close

August 22, 2016

HRP Welcomes New Associate Director for Academic Program

Posted by Gerald Neuman

Today I have the honor of announcing an exciting new appointment at the Human Rights Program. Emily Nagisa Keehn has joined HRP as Associate Director for the Academic Program.  Emily is a dynamic and skillful human rights lawyer, who will bring leadership and experience to the work of the Academic Program, and who looks forward to developing strong relationships with our students.  She will also act as an important liaison between the HRP Academic Program and other parts of the Law School and the University.

Emily Nagisa Keehn

Emily Nagisa Keehn

Emily joins the Human Rights Program from Sonke Gender Justice in Cape Town, where she was the head of policy development and advocacy. In this role, she directed strategic litigation, research, parliamentary engagement, and advocacy pertaining to human rights, gender, and HIV. She primarily focuses on human rights issues at the intersection of criminal justice, gender, and health.

Previously, Emily worked for UCLA School of Law, where she developed and ran a post-graduate legal fellowship for Southern African public interest lawyers, culminating in an LL.M. and a one-year work placement with a human rights organization. Emily’s experience spans Southern Africa, Southeast Asia, Israel and the U.S. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of California, San Diego, and a J.D. from UCLA School of Law.

At HRP, Emily will play a substantive and managerial role in innovating and implementing academic activities, including the speaker series, conferences, and the Academic Program’s various fellowships.

We welcome her warmly and look forward to your meeting her soon.

Share By Email

loading
Close

May 20, 2016

Video Slideshow: “Women’s Voices Matter” in Myanmar

Posted by Cara Solomon and Tyler Giannini

The International Human Rights Clinic had the great honor last month of hosting a three-day workshop in Yangon for some of the leading women advocates in Myanmar- all of them pioneers in their various fields, and all of them pushing for change. The training, facilitated by The Op-Ed Project, focused on voice and messaging in the media’s opinion sections, where women’s bylines are too rarely found.

The title of the workshop: “Write to Change the World.” Below, some images from those three days, with thanks and appreciation for what these women have done to strengthen the world already, and what they will surely do in the decades to come.

Share By Email

loading
Close

January 26, 2016

Moving on from the Human Rights Program (a note from Mindy Jane Roseman)

Posted by Mindy Roseman

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

After ten years as Academic Director at the Human Rights Program, and many years before that as a collaborator at the Harvard School of Public Health, I write to let you know that I am leaving HRP, effective February 5, 2016.  I will be joining Yale Law School as Director of both its International Programs and its Gruber Program on Global Justice and Women’s Rights. This was not an easy decision, especially since it means I will be warming the bench from the other side of the basketball court.

There are many communities at Harvard Law School that are dear to me, but I cherish HRP — its work, staff, faculty, students, alumni — perhaps above all. I’ll still be on campus this semester (teaching a seminar), and my email will be active through June.

I hope to stay in touch and wish you all the best of luck.

Fondly,

Mindy

Share By Email

loading
Close

March 13, 2014

Tomorrow, March 12: “Legal Feminism in Latin America” and “Honoring Nelson Mandela”


As we round the corner on Friday, here are two events we think are definitely worth your time tomorrow.

The first,  “Legal Feminism in Latin America,” is a breakfast talk by Professors Cristina Jaramillo and Paola Bergallo, who will discuss challenges the region faces with regard to reproductive rights. The talk is being organized by the SJD Association and the Harvard Women’s Law Association.

Later that day, at noon, HLS has organized a panel, “In Honor of Nelson Mandela,” which will explore the question of when, if ever, violence is justified in the fight for social change. Our very own Susan Farbstein will be on the panel, which Prof. Charles Ogletree is moderating. Details of both events below.

Enjoy!


“Legal Feminism in Latin America”


10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

WCC 3015

The SJD Association and the Women’s Law Association invite you to an informal breakfast talk by Professors Cristina Jaramillo and Paola Bergallo about legal feminism in Latin America and the challenges the region faces with regard to reproductive rights. Professor Jaramillo is an HLS alumnae and has been called upon as an expert by the Colombian Senate on issues of women’s political participation, divorce, and gender discrimination. Professor Bergallo is currently a visiting fellow at HLS and has been called as an expert by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Breakfast will be served. Please contact Regina Larrea if you are interested in attending.


“In Honor of Nelson Mandela”


12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Langdell 272

Please join Harvard Law School for a discussion about when, if ever, violence is justifiable in struggles for political or social change. Panelists: Mekonnen Firew Ayano, SJD Candidate; Randall Kennedy, HLS Michael R. Klein Professor of Law; Kerry Chance, American Council of Learned Societies New Faculty Fellow, Harvard University Anthropology Department; Aminu Gamawa, SJD Candidate; and Susan Farbstein, HLS Assistant Clinical Professor of Law, Co-Director of the International Human Rights Clinic. Moderator: Charles Ogletree, HLS Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice.

February 27, 2014

Tomorrow, Feb. 28: “Transgender Identity, Mental Health, and Human Rights: The DSM V and Beyond”


Event Notice

“Transgender Identity, Mental Health, and Human Rights: The DSM V and Beyond”


12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Hauser 102

Light lunch will be served

Please join us for a discussion with panelists: Sara Kimmel, staff psychologist at Harvard University Student Mental Health Services; Eszter Kismödi, international human rights lawyer on sexual and reproductive health law, policy, and research; Zack Paakkonen, staff attorney with GLAD’s Transgender Rights Project; and moderator Mindy Roseman, Academic Director of the Human Rights Program and Lecturer on Law, Harvard Law School.

This event is being co-sponsored by the Radcliffe Institute, HLS Lambda, and the Petrie-Flom Center

Share By Email

loading
Close

April 5, 2013

Coming Monday, April 8: “Women Attorneys Working with International Clients”


Event Notice

Monday, April 8, 2013


“Women Attorneys Working with International Clients: Challenges and Advantages”


12- 1 pm

WCC 3018

Explore the challenges and advantages of working with international clients as a women attorney with practitioners from both the public and private sectors. Panelists include Susan Farbstein, Clinical Professor in the Harvard International Human Rights Clinic and co-counsel in In re South African Apartheid Litigation; Meeta Anand, an associate in the White & Case LLP project finance group with extensive experience working with Latin American clients, both as an attorney and an investment banker; and Carolina Walther-Meade, a partner in the Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy Project Finance and Latin American Practice Groups who spends a significant amount of time in the firm’s São Paulo office.

The attorneys will discuss issues ranging from the role that gender plays in client interactions, potential problems that may arise, and strategies for addressing these problems. Professor Fionnuala Ni Aolain, who has served as expert and consultant to the UN OHCHR and UN WOMEN and for the Office of the UN Secretary-General, will moderate.

Co-sponsored by the Milbank Tweed Student Conference Fund

POSTED IN

Share By Email

loading
Close

March 20, 2013

Iraqi Civilians and U.S. Veterans Come Together to Demand the Right to Heal

Posted by Cara Solomon, Deborah Popowski and Stella Kim, JD '13

Yesterday, on the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, we joined our coalition partners in the launch of the Right to Heal initiative, a collaboration between Iraq Veterans Against the War  (IVAW), the Organisation of Women’s Freedom in Iraq (OWFI), and the Federation of Workers Councils and Unions in Iraq (FWCUI), as well as other supporting organizations. One by one, standing in front of the White House, members of IVAW and OWFI delivered the message that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are not over for them.

On the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, Joyce Wagner, member of Iraq Veterans Against the War, gives testimony in front of the White House. Drake Logan, a member of the Civilian-Soldier Alliance, stands beside her.
On the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, Joyce Wagner, member of Iraq Veterans Against the War, gives testimony about the oppression of women on both sides of the conflict. Drake Logan, a member of the Civilian-Soldier Alliance, stands beside her.

The organizations, represented by the Center for Constitutional Rights, announced that they would file a petition for a thematic hearing before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, calling for U.S. accountability for the human cost of these wars. In testimonies that were both moving and motivating, speakers on both sides of the U.S.-led conflict in Iraq described the toll that a decade of war had taken on their communities, including the loss of thousands of lives; devastating trauma and injury with shamefully inadequate or non-existent medical care; a legacy of health and environmental poisoning due to toxic munitions and burn pits; gender-based violence as a weapon and byproduct of war; and a generation of orphans and displaced people.

Joyce Wagner, a longtime member of IVAW, spoke about the violence the war had unleashed on women, and specifically, about her experience with Military Sexual Trauma. We thank her for allowing us to reprint her comments below:

In recent years, the United Nations has taken a strong stance against gender-based violence, calling it a “pandemic” that concerns not only women, but every single person on the planet.

Worldwide, it is estimated that one in five women will be raped in her lifetime. In the US military, it is estimated that one in three women will be raped during her time in service. I am the one in three.

Continue Reading…