Blog: Harvard International Law Journal

  • Page 1 of 1

September 28, 2020

Susan Farbstein Publishes Article about Apartheid Litigation in Harvard International Law Journal


The most recent print edition of the Harvard International Law Journal, published today, features an article by Susan Farbstein, International Human Rights Clinic Co-Director and Clinical Professor at Harvard Law School, about the long-running Apartheid suit.  Entitled “Perspectives from a Practitioner: Lessons Learned From The Apartheid Litigation,” the piece draws on her work as co-counsel in the Alien Tort Statute case that sought to hold corporations accountable for their role facilitating human rights abuse in apartheid South Africa.

“The article really represents my attempt, as a human rights practitioner, to analyze the experience of litigating the Apartheid suit,” Farbstein explains.  “While lawsuits alone can’t fundamentally improve human rights, the article contends that litigation can be a powerful option for individuals or communities that have survived human rights abuse, and that it played an important role for many stakeholders involved in this particular case.  I try to honestly consider the challenges that we faced over the years, and acknowledge the ways that we fell short of our ambitions.  But I also suggest that critiques of human rights litigation often miss the mark because they demand too much of litigation—which is, of course, just one of the many tools available to the human rights movement—and because the critiques fail to understand the multiple goals of this kind of effort.” 

Continue Reading…
POSTED IN

Share By Email

loading
Close

March 8, 2011

What it Takes to Work in Human Rights: An Interview with Jim Cavallaro

Posted by Cara Solomon

Here’s our very own Jim Cavallaro talking to the Harvard International Law Journal about how he got started in the field of human rights, and what it takes to make an organization work on the ground.  He also offers some good advice for students, including this:

“I encourage students to go somewhere that they might want to work and to be prepared to spend time there learning the ropes. Not a few weeks or months, but years. That’s what it takes. To be successful, you have to be part of the local human rights community, you have to understand the local culture, language, norms, and so forth. They say that all politics is local.  Well, at some level, so is all human rights work.  Or at least all good human rights work.”

Share By Email

loading
Close

  • Page 1 of 1