The Human Rights Program organizes dozens of events annually, ranging from formal lectures to brown bag lunches to workshops and panels. Speakers include advocates, scholars, government officials, community leaders, and policymakers. We often collaborate with students groups and other schools and programs on campus to sponsor events.

February 25, 2019

The First Smartphone Genocide? Incitement of Rome Statute Crimes in the Facebook Era

When: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Where: WCC B010 Singer Classroom

Please join the Human Rights Program for a talk by current Satter Human Rights Fellow, Jenny Domino LLM’18. Domino will discuss insights from her work on responding to hate speech with ARTICLE 19, an NGO that focuses on the freedom of information and expression. Echoing the use of the newspaper during the Holocaust and the radio during the Rwandan genocide, Facebook has become the leading platform in Myanmar to incite violence against the Rohingya. As a Satter Fellow, Domino researches the use of Facebook, and how it transforms the commission of the crime of incitement.

She holds a JD from the University of the Philippines College of Law and an AB from Ateneo de Manila University.

Lunch will be served. Co-sponsored by the Harvard Human Rights Journal.

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February 26, 2019

Rights Discourses, Legal Pluralism, and Poverty in South Africa: Transformative Constitutionalism and the Purported Decolonization of South African Law

When: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Where: WCC 2004

Join the Human Rights Program for a talk by Dr. Sindiso Mnisi Weeks, Assistant Professor at the School for Global Inclusion and Social Development at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Professor Mnisi Weeks will discuss her work examining the “empowerment / dis-empowerment paradox of rights discourses” in South Africa—the most unequal country in the world. Her work examines how, in this context of extreme inequality, the legal concepts of rights, security, and justice are interpreted by those who are socially, economically, and politically excluded, in comparison to those who form part of the dominant legal culture.

Co-Sponsored by the Harvard Center for African Studies, the Harvard African Law Association, HLS Advocates for Human Rights, Harvard Human Rights Journal, and the Institute for Global Law & Policy. Lunch will be served.

Sindiso Mnisi Weeks is Assistant Professor, Public Policy of Excluded Populations at the School for Global Inclusion and Social Development at UMass Boston. She has served as a senior researcher in the Centre for Law and Society at the University of Cape Town (UCT). In her role at UCT, she worked on the Rural Women’s Action-Research program. This program combines research, advocacy, and policy work on women, property, and governing authority under customary law. She also taught African Customary Law as a senior lecturer in UCT’s Department of Private Law. In 2013-2014, she was a resident scholar at the University of New Hampshire School of Law, where she held a fellowship for the completion of a book.

Mnisi Weeks has published in academic and popular media on customary law, women’s rights, cultural rights, governance, participatory democracy, dispute management, and the South African constitution. As a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, she researched the tensions between living customary law(s) and South African state law. Prior to Oxford, she clerked for the Deputy Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa, Dikgang Moseneke. Her current work focuses on the pursuit of justice and human security in indigenous courts by poor women and men living in rural South Africa.

As a young researcher, Mnisi Weeks is highly rated by the National Research Foundation of South Africa. She has been the recipient of a number of awards, including the Women in Science Award for the Development of Rural Women through Science and Technology.

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March 11, 2019

Book Talk: Global Health Justice and Governance

When: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Where: Milstein East C

In a world beset by serious and unconscionable health disparities, by dangerous contagions that can circle our globalized planet in hours, and by a bewildering confusion of health actors and systems, humankind needs a new vision, a new architecture, new coordination among renewed systems to ensure central health capabilities for all. Dr. Jennifer Prah Ruger‘s recent book, Global Health Justice and Governance (Oxford University Press, 2018), lays out the critical problems facing the world today and offers a new theory of justice and governance as a way to resolve these seemingly intractable issues.

A fundamental responsibility of society is to ensure human flourishing. The central role that health plays in flourishing places a unique claim on our public institutions and resources, to ensure central health capabilities to reduce premature death and avoid preventable morbidities. Faced with staggering inequalities, imperiling epidemics, and inadequate systems, the world desperately needs a new global health architecture.

Join us for a discussion of these issues with the author!

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided. RSVP now!

Hosted by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics and co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program.

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March 14, 2019

Criminalization of Homosexuality in Tunisia: From Colonialism to Present-Day Activism

When: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Where: WCC 1019

Please join ILSP-LSC for a lunch talk featuring Dr. Ramy Khouili, a Tunisian doctor and human rights activist, and Daniel Levine-Spound JD’19, who will examine the origins and dynamics of the criminalization of homosexuality in Tunisia.  Khouili and Levine-Spound will present their original research analyzing the emergence of the Tunisian Sodomy Law, from its colonial inclusion during the French protectorate to its application in 21st century Tunisia, and discuss Tunisian LGBTQ activism and efforts of activists to decriminalize homosexuality in Tunisia.

Part of the Gender, Law, and Society Workshop Series. 
Lunch will be provided.

Co-Hosted by the Program on Law and Society in the Muslim World & the International Human Rights Clinic.  Co-sponsored by HRP, HLS Advocates, MELSA, LAMBDA, LIDS, Harvard Human Rights Journal, and the Religious Literacy Project at HDS.

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April 04, 2019

Drafting a Convention on Crimes Against Humanity

When: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Where: WCC 1019

Please join us for a talk by Sean Murphy, Manatt/Ahn Professor of International Law and Special Rapporteur for Crimes Against Humanity with the International Law Commission. Professor Murphy will discuss efforts to draft new articles in preparation for a convention on the punishment and prevention of crimes against humanity.

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