The Human Rights Program produces a range of publications based on academic research and practice in the field of human rights. Faculty, staff, and fellows author a diverse assortment of reports, scholarly articles, books, legal briefs, policy papers, and other publications. Students are also integrally involved in many publications.

Most Recent

Myths and Realities About Incendiary Weapons (November 2018)

International Human Rights Clinic and Human Rights Watch

Brief for Plaintiffs-Appellants (October 2018)

in Mamani, et al., v Sánchez de Lozada and Sánchez Berzain; Counsel: Judith Chomsky, Beth Stevens, James E. Tysse, Steven H. Schulman, Lide E. More…

The Ambitions of Muslim Family Law Reform (October 2018)

Salma Waheedi, Kristen A. Stilt, and Swarthi Gandhavadi Griffin; in Harvard Journal of Law and Gender

Humanitarian Disarmament Conference Summary (October 2018)

Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative

Human Rights, Treaties, and International Legitimacy (October 2018)

Gerald L. Neuman; in Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder

Political Legitimacy and Private Governance of Human Rights: Community-Business Social Contracts and Constitutional Moments (October 2018)

Tyler Giannini; in Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder

Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder (October 2018)

Edited by Gerald L. Neuman and Silja Voeneky

Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder brings together respected scholars from diverse disciplines to examine a trio of key concepts that help to stabilize states and the international order. While used pervasively by philosophers, legal scholars, and politicians, the precise content of these concepts is disputed, and they face new challenges in the conditions of disorder brought by the twenty-first century. This volume will explore the interrelationships and possible tensions between human rights, democracy, and legitimacy, from the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives; as well as the role of these concepts in addressing particular problems such as economic inequality, catastrophic risks posed by new technologies, access to health care, regional governance, and responses to mass migration. Made up of essays arising from an interdisciplinary symposium convened at Harvard Law School in 2016, this volume will examine how these trusted concepts may bring order to the global community.

Supporting Kakuma’s Refugees: The Importance of Freedom of Movement (September 2018)

International Human Rights Clinic and Norwegian Refugee Council, Kenya

Supporting Kakuma’s Refugee Traders: The Importance of Business Documentation in an Informal Economy (September 2018)

International Human Rights Clinic and Norwegian Refugee Council, Kenya

Pollsmoor: Reducing Overcrowding in a South African Remand Detention Facility (August 2018)

Ariane Nevin and Emily Nagisa Keehn; in the Evidence for HIV Prevention in Southern Africa Case Study Series

Why We Need A Pre-Emptive Ban On ‘Killer Robots’ (August 2018)

Bonnie Docherty; in The Huffington Post

We’re Running Out of Time to Stop Killer Robot Weapons (April 2018)

Bonnie Docherty; in The Guardian

Victim Assistance Under the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (April 2018)

International Human Rights Clinic

Decriminalization and the UN Human Rights Bodies (March 2018)

Emily Nagisa Keehn

Amici Curiae Brief on Behalf of Scholars of Habeas Corpus Law to U.S. Court of Appeals (Sixth Circuit) (February 2018)

in Usama Jamil Hamama, et al., v. Thomas Homan, Deputy Director and Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Director, U.S. Immigration and More…

How Mass Incarceration Harms U.S. Health, In 5 Charts (January 2018)

Emily Nagisa Keehn; in The Conversation